WORKSHOP: Shutter Speed

WORKSHOP: Shutter Speed

There are three basic components to capturing a photo using your camera: Aperture, ISO, and Shutter Speed. These three mechanics regulate the amount of light that enters your camera sensor. How much of that light hitting the sensor can affect the quality of the image you capture. This tutorial will cover shutter speed. Your shutter speed is the speed in which the mirror or shutter inside your camera lifts to expose the sensor to light. These speeds are measures in fractions of a second. For instance, a 1/250 shutter speed means that your camera sensor will be exposed to light for 1/250th of a second, or... 1 รท 250 = 0.004 seconds So when you press your "shutter button" the mirror or shutter covering the camera sensor will lift at the speed you entered to capture the image. In reality, all your camera is capturing is light. Naturally, the longer your sensor has time to absorb light, the brighter...
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WORKSHOP: What does shooting RAW do?

In a previous post, we went over whether or not shooting RAW is right for you. In this post, we're going to go over what shooting RAW actually does Since RAW images are data files with information about light, they allow you to manipulate light in your images better than a standard JPG does. So what does this mean? Highlights, exposure, white balance, and vibrance look more natural when edited in post-production if you're editing a RAW file. Take the next two photos as an example; can you tell which is the JPG and which is the RAW? If you guessed that the brighter image was the RAW file, then you guessed correct. Both images were post-processed with the exact same settings in Lightroom, but since RAW images handle light information better, editing the exposure in this photo resulted in brighter, more vibrant light than what was processed in the JPG. The JPG would need a little more tweaking to...
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WORKSHOP: Should I be Shooting RAW?

WORKSHOP: Should I be Shooting RAW?

"I SHOOT RAW" Popularized by one of my favorite photographers, Jared Polin (Fro Knows Photos), shooting RAW is a rule I've adopted and you should too. Most cameras, even the ones in your cell phone, have the option to shoot RAW. Before you go and enable the feature, there are a few things you should know about this file type. This is the RAW option on Canon's interface RAW images are data files of light information that your camera processes after capturing a photo. These files usually have extensions of ".raw", ".dng" (or Digital Negative), or ".cr2" depending on the camera manufacturer. Since these files are essentially compilations of light data, they make post-processing editing a lot more flexible than editing a standard ".jpg" image. But with this flexibility comes a couple drawbacks. The file size are substantially larger than .jpg images, so they'll take up more space on your hard drive or cloud storage. These raw images need special software to...
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WORKSHOP: Quick Photo Tip: Rule of Thirds

WORKSHOP: Quick Photo Tip: Rule of Thirds

Photos you take on your cell phone don't have to suck, so follow this pro-tip to post good eye candy to your feed. Most photographers emphasize good composition, but all can agree that following the "Rule of Thirds" can make almost any photo eye catching. It's called the Rule of Thirds because the composition of the frame is broken into three parts, like this: This composition gives your photo "structure." There's some science (psychology) behind it since your brain naturally looks for structure in any environment - it's looking for a pattern. It's why things like seashells are eye catching to us. Aligning the subject of your photo to one of the interesting lines of the Rule of Thirds composition can help give your photo the structure it needs. Similarly, aligning the horizon of your photo to any of the horizontal lines in the composition will also improve it's marketability. If you're shooting a standing subject, try aligning the subject to either...
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